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Cystic fibrosis research trial in Wythenshawe

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A new trial is currently taking place at the Medicines Evaluation Unit in Wythenshawe. It aims to combine different treatments to correct the underlying defect in Cystic Fibrosis in the hope of stabilising the disease and preventing lung damage happening in the first place.

Group of people sitting at tables and holding up like and dislike signs - Public Programmes Team
Joanna (second from left) taking part in a patient panel

Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a complex inherited condition that particularly affects the lungs, with progressive lung damage and repeated infections from birth. CF can also cause diabetes and there are important effects on the gut and liver. Treatments include intravenous antibiotics (given through a vein, often in hospital), and lengthy nebulised (inhaled) treatments to deal with the consequences of CF.

A trial currently taking place at the Medicines Evaluation Unit in Wythenshawe is of a new class of medications that aims to combine different treatments to correct to underlying defect in CF, with the aim of stabilising the disease and preventing lung damage happening in the first place.

Joanna Edmonds, 34, who got involved in our Breathtaking Lungs' focus groups and patient panels is one of the patients taking part in the trial.

Joanna said: “It’s a triple therapy combo to treat the underlying cause of CF. It’s only phase one of the trial so there isn't much info on it at the moment but I decided to do the study because it’s so important for research. We need new drugs to treat CF as more and more people are becoming resistant to antibiotics.

"The trial will probably have no benefits for me personally but it will provide important information on how the drug interacts with a CF patient’s body and I'm lucky enough to be in a position right now where my health is stable enough to partake in the study.

"It’s one of many studies I've done for CF. I’m hoping one day we will have a choice of therapies and the younger CF generation won't have to experience the same gruelling treatment burden my generation have to endure day-to-day.”

The trial is being led by Dr Alex Horsley, Honorary Consultant, Manchester Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre and Deputy Director, Respiratory and Allergy Clinical Research Facility at Wythenshawe Hospital.

Dr Horsley said: "Joanna is the first CF patient to receive this combination of CF treatments, and we are very excited to be supporting this trial. This is a very active area of research in CF.

"There are already medications like this available for a small number of CF patients with very specific changes in their CF genes, and these have transformed their condition, but the new therapies in trial aim to make these benefits available to thousands of other CF patients."

Visit the Wythenshawe Hospital website for more information about how you can get involved in research.